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Topic:
Does MX-980 supports RF without a blaster?
This thread has 8 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 11:14
tsaxman
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I'm planning to purchase an MX-980 so I can control a mix of IR/RF devices. Does the stand alone remote, as fancy as it may seen, supports sending both IR and/or RF signals as a single unit? or do I have to purchase a "blaster" such as the MRF**s?

If the MX-980 doesn't, are the other remotes that can do it?
 
Thanks.
Post 2 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 12:21
Lowhz
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The URC remotes transmit IR to anything that will receive IR but only* transmit RF to URC RF bases, eg MRF260 and MRF350.

What RF stuff do you think you're going to control with just a remote handset? RF isn't nearly as simple as IR.
Post 3 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 12:21
kgossen
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Whichever remote you choose you will always need a base station or "blaster". With the exception of some URC/Zwave lighting, no RF remote will talk directly to an RF device.
"Quality isn't expensive, it's Priceless!"
OP | Post 4 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 13:27
tsaxman
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That's interesting and somewhat misleading from URC's part, I might say.

So the fact that on the MX-980 box says that it is an "IR/RF Remote Control", it means it can only control certain pre-defined components (blasters)?

On the other hand, the URC MX-450 (which could have been another option to me) reads that "Can use Narrow Band width RF or IR to control all devices.". Does it means that it fits the same RF requirements as the MX-980?

BTW, thanks for taking the time and for the explanations.
Post 5 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 13:34
kgossen
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On October 26, 2012 at 13:27, tsaxman said...
That's interesting and somewhat misleading from URC's part, I might say.

So the fact that on the MX-980 box says that it is an "IR/RF Remote Control", it means it can only control certain pre-defined components (blasters)?

On the other hand, the URC MX-450 (which could have been another option to me) reads that "Can use Narrow Band width RF or IR to control all devices.". Does it means that it fits the same RF requirements as the MX-980?

BTW, thanks for taking the time and for the explanations.

The 450 requires a blaster from URC as well. Every brand of remote that has RF capability requires their own blaster except those that come with the device.
"Quality isn't expensive, it's Priceless!"
Post 6 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 15:03
tweeterguy
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It's funny how people get confused about that. I've had people ask if they can control everything from ceiling fans to a/c units to garage door openers directly via the remote's RF output.
OP | Post 7 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 16:42
tsaxman
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You're right. Some may think it's consumer's confusion, while others may argue it's deceiving advertising. Any consumer with a basic knonwledge about remote controls can easily fall for advertising that says "Can use Narrow Band width RF or IR to control all devices.". Even if they want to control some RF ceiling fan altogether with their A/V system, right? I know I would.

I just wish companies could be clear about their product advertising, to at least say something like "... for RF devices, it requires aditional such and such..."
Post 8 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 17:06
tweeterguy
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While I can see where the confusion lies, in their defense the products you are looking at are meant for professional installers who already know that it's not possible or are taught that in URC training.

So...what exactly are you trying to control? There are often different ways to accomplish controlling devices that, at least initially, seem not possible.
Post 9 made on Friday October 26, 2012 at 21:25
goldenzrule
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On October 26, 2012 at 16:42, tsaxman said...
You're right. Some may think it's consumer's confusion, while others may argue it's deceiving advertising. Any consumer with a basic knonwledge about remote controls can easily fall for advertising that says "Can use Narrow Band width RF or IR to control all devices.". Even if they want to control some RF ceiling fan altogether with their A/V system, right? I know I would.

I just wish companies could be clear about their product advertising, to at least say something like "... for RF devices, it requires aditional such and such..."

URC doesn't advertise anything. As tweeterguy said, this is a product sold only through professional installation firms. They feel there is no need to put on a box what all of its trained installers know. With that said, all universal rf remotes require the same thing. I believe it is unfair to blame a company for something that you simply are not yet familiar with. You did your homework here and now know what you will need to accomplish your goals. You should be happy you have this figured out now, before going through the hassles of finding out later.


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